Make sure you've played each game at least once and ideally, you've played each one outside at least once too.

Beyond that, here are some general guidelines (emphasis on the "guidelines." These are not hard rules.) for when to move on.

When to Move On From Distractions

Leave It

  • Your pup successfully responds to your "leave it" cue for a low-to-medium distraction
  • You've had at least one successful instance of using this on a real-world distraction

Go See

  • Your pup responds to your cue by investigating the distraction that interests him
  • You've had at least one successful instance of using this on a real-world walk

Polite Approaches

  • Your pup politely approaches, at least 80% of the time, a distraction that they once pulled towards

Polite Walk-bys

  • Your pup politely walks by, at least 80% of the time, a distraction that they once pulled towards

Speed Bumps

  • Give each speed bump technique a fair shot until you feel like you both understand how they are to be used and whether or not they're useful for you

Training Advice Going Forward

  • Take note of the distractions you'd most like to work on minimizing and apply one of the above methods until you're happy with the results. Then repeat the process with another distraction.
  • Use these on real-world walks as needed and make sure to protect their effectiveness. If your pup is ignoring your cues don't keep repeating the cues. Instead, plan training sessions to specifically work on those areas.

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