Make sure you've played each game at least once and ideally, you've played each one outside at least once too.

Beyond that, here are some general guidelines (emphasis on the "guidelines." These are not hard rules.) for when to move on.

When to Move On From Moving

Walk Together

  • Your pup walks by your side in a complicated pattern around your house even when you don't have a treat in your hand (the more the treats are hidden, the better, so that your pup doesn't only "walk together" when you have a treat)

Walk Together Outside

  • Your pup walks by your side in a complicated pattern in a low to medium distraction environment even when you don't have a treat in your hand (the more the treats are hidden, the better, so that your pup doesn't only "walk together" when you have a treat)
  • You have at least short bursts of success with this while on a real walk

Profit Position on Cue

  • Your pup is coming in close when you give your cue in a low-to-no distraction environment
  • You've used this while outside on a real walk with at least some success

Nice and Easy Stops

  • Your pup immediately stops inside when you give the cue and come to a stop
  • You've used the cue while outside on a real walk with at least some success

Training Advice Going Forward

  • Try to reduce the amount of treats you give your pup while playing "Walk Together" until you're only giving a treat every ten, twenty, and then thrity steps.
  • Try to hide the treats when you play "Walk Together." If you always wear a treat pouch or something else, your pup will start to pick up on that and may be less willing to work with you if she doesn't see the treat pouch
  • "Profit Position on Cue" and "Nice And Easy Stops" will require a lot of practice in order to be useful tools, so plan to revisit these games and spend additional training sessions focused specifically on those

Take your relationship with your dog to the next level

Give Harper a try. No obligations. No gimmicks. No cat people.

Start your free trial